IT and IT tools

BNBT update - for sale!

After my wonderings (why so many seem to be so eager to get a foot in the door at large retailers) of the last two weeks on Britain's Next Big Thing, an update on various contributors to the program.

Although there is economy in large numbers (sold through big retailers), never forget the "economy of profit in smaller numbers"

Beeble

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Straight from the designer's own online website, and priced according his own expressed wishes during BNBT #3 (normally £ 200.00 - now with 25% off, but with the profit in smaller numbers).

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Hula for sale at Habitat

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"Habitat Hula" at a price of £ 230.00 (where Laura sold her original Hula direct to her clients for £ 300.00)

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No online shop available to buy direct from Laura Wellington

SunSnoozer

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For sale online. all 1500 of them! Through Baby Beamers own online shop, Jojo Maman Bebe and.... Amazon.co.uk for £ 24.99 (ex P&P)
(SunSnoozer not to be confused with the black SnoozeShade from another mum + designer)

It's not the price that's always more important

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Always love to see these statistics on Amazon.co.uk - puts paid to the myth that everyone always makes their buying decision based on price alone.

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Frog BracKit

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For sale on Debbie Evershed's own Frog BracKit website
(which home page "jumps" all over the place and is missing various very basic SEO items, such as page titles - not a great advertisement for the web designer The Design Complex, who shows the Frog BracKit as their Featured design, oh dear. For the webshop itself I would have chosen the free version of Ecwid, not the Shopify "pay-when-you-sell" program - but that's for another post, not here - UPDATE 03.05.11: someone's been paying attention, pages on Frog BacKit now all have names ;-))

Prices and kits

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Price for the Frog BracKit £ 18.00 (frog shaped bracket only), the various kits containing the bars and hooks start from £ 18.59 to £ 34.54

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At Habitat (confused!)

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The Frog Kit is for sale in the Habitat online shop, but rather confusingly the bars and hooks can't seem to be found straight from the essential product.
(Originally found the Frog Kit through Google, can't figure out in which category in the habitat online shop it is listed - they don't seem to be using simple "bread-crumbs", just major categories)
Tried a product search on Frog It to see if the bar and hook kits were listed somewhere else only to find this result:

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Frog Bracket or Frog BracKit gives the same 0 result.
Then I tried "Frog" and up they came:

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Not a very user friendly experience I must say. It's like hiding the "latest product with a buzz" deep at the back of the store.

Frog itself, cheaper than on The Frog BracKit site, but combining the sets of same length bars makes any ready packed kit still cheaper IMHO. (the lengths above do not actually read 141.5 cm but l (as in length) 41.5 cm)

Tracy Wood Products

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Now, that's a great sight for sore eyes ;-)
No wonder Tracy tweets:

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Although, her website could do with some better SEO too - again the page titles are missing, what's so difficult for a web designer - Vosweb - to do this little simple thingy?

Conclusion

The three big retailers are attractive for suppliers/designers to sell (hoping to sell) larger numbers of their products. BNBT gives them a higher profile, and I sincerely hope their own websites and online selling takes off or improves as a result. My fear with new buzz products is always: how long are they the Next Big Thing at these big retailers? And then what?

The websites I've seen today could all do with improvement though - even the Habitat one, but that's not my objective - from the most simple SEO Meta tags to simpler and cheaper shopping carts.
Upwards and onwards with my guide, it's great fun and exciting at the same time bringing 4 free (plus 1 "pay-when-you-sell") online software programs together to help small businesses with the "economy of profit in smaller numbers".


BNBT #3, Habitat - shocking maths

Watched Britain's Next Big Thing episode 3 last night, designers trying to get a foot in the door at Habitat (150 outlets). For starters, if anyone still dares to say Britain does not have designing talent any longer, they better start watching this program. From frog-brackets (Debbie Evershed, selling them already at markets - through to the next stage) to modular seating (not gone through).

The eagerness

What made me shake my head various times during the program is - as mentioned last week - the eagerness some display to get that foot in the door with one of the big retailers, no matter what the costs!

One candidate who was introduced last week, pitching her sunsnoozer to Boots buying team, has gone through the next stage of discussions with the health and beauty retailer but nothing definite yet. Still, Brigitte Lydum as gone ahead and ordered 1500 units of her Sunsnoozer from her Srilankan manufacturer (that's a lot of boxes stored in her living room, as you can see during episode 3).

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It's down to Mr Retail himself Theo Paphitis to tell her to start thinking about how she's planning to sell the 1500 units if Boots decides not to take it on now - the sunsnoozer being a seasonal product, no much sun in Winter. A personal loan she took out for the order is at stake if she doesn't start asking Boots what their real and short term plans are. Being asked the samples is all she heard lately, not even a date of when the next discussion will take place based on the samples sent.

The maths

Beside the "I am in the next stage, so I'll just wait for things to happen" there are the maths.

Steven Bidduph pitched his Beeble footstool at the open day of Habitat. During his pitch he mentioned the retail price he had in mind the outlets would charge for his product - around £199.00 and him selling his footstool to Habitat for around £ 85.00.
This was immediately waved away by the buyers: we have to sell this under £ 100.00 so that means a purchase price lower than £ 30.00

Holey smoke! Supposing the £ 100.00 is including VAT (£ 83.34 ex) it is still lower than the purchase price the designer had in mind. I can imagine the overheads of a big retailer being quite large, but a mark up of 177% is jaw dropping. But again, a very delighted designer - he's gone through the next round and is already hard at work of getting his product price to the level habitat is expecting of him.

Simple maths now. There is of course economy in large numbers, but still. Steven still has to make his own profit. Suppose he manages to bring the purchase price for habitat down to £ 29.00 and habitat sells it for £ 99.00 (£ 82.50 ex VAT). Habitat's gross profit £ 53.50 per Beeble, Steven's profit per Beeble? Sincerely hope for him he makes at least a fiver out of it or perhaps even a tenner. Let's, for simplicity sake, make it £ 7.50 gross profit for him per Beeble. So he has to hope habitat sells all lot of Beebles. It will take at least 7 of them for Steven to make roughly the same money (gross) Habitat does on one.

What if he would sell the Beebles on his own? Retail price £ 95.00, on a higher production price (lower numbers in production) of £ 35.00. That would make his gross profit around £ 44.00 per Beeble. Meaning, he only has to sell 2 to reach the same gross profit he would have if Habitat managed to sell 7.
Another designer at Habitat's open day also got through to the next stage with her Hula lamps, but on the condition she will stop sell her products (charging £ 300.00 a piece) herself and grand habitat exclusivity on them - while they plan to sell them at a much lower price, more in line with other lighting articles they already carry.

The Long Tail

Getting through to the next stage during the open days at the big retailers in this program means a few things, one extremely important:
if big retailers can see there's a market for your design, product - so should you. Proof is in the pudding with the frog-bracket, Tracy Woods Eczema ointment and even the Hula's

Many other hopefuls fell at the first round, they didn't. I just can't get my head around the fact that especially now with more and more evidence of Long Tail commercial viable products - read "profitable in smaller numbers", it's still the big retailers many turn to instead of doing some simple maths and "going-it-alone". To me it's a no-brainer

Selling Online Basics (SO-basic)

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Since the second episode of BNBT I've been steaming ahead with my new E-guide: Selling Online Basics and it is progressing nicely. The more I see of BNBT, the more I'm convinced it is the basic online knowledge - absolutely not hard to learn - many are missing to take the step to "go-it-alone" with their products.
Give it another week or so and my guide will be ready. 

UPDATE 19.05.11: "Selling Online Basics" officially launched!


To retail or ecommerce

BBC has a new "business" program: Britain's Next Big Thing - launched last week. MR RETAIL himself, Theo Paphitis follows a group of small businesses, some working from their own kitchen or workshop, when they try to have their products accepted on the shelves of 3 big retailers: Liberty, Boots and Habitat

Boots

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This week's episode showed 10 hopefuls venturing in to Boots HQ. The one that amazed me most, just by one single revelation, was Tracy Wood, producing eczema ointment in her own kitchen in New Haven.

(Her story could have been my mum's story. Not that my mum created a natural product to ease eczema and walked into a big retailers HQ, more her story about also having a very young baby - me - with atopic eczema and the natural remedies she tried to ease this skin problem with. Sea salt and soft soap (groene zeep) for years and years. Boy, these remedies didn't half sting! But they did ease the eczema: sea salt - swimming in the North sea every single day during the summer holidays - and soft soap, rubbed - really rubbed! - in my skin during the winter months.)

During a quick take showing Theo and Tracy she revealed she was already selling the product, due to existing clients recommending her product to others.

"I've must have sold around 70.000+ jars from my own kitchen already."

Holy-smoke, that's a big buzz - even Theo was impressed.

I understand the image of having your own product on the shelves of one of Britain's biggest health and beauty care retailers gives - and at this point in the series it is still not known if Tracy will succeed in this - but 70.000+ sold already without any noticeable branding is IMHO quite an achievement.
(Looking at Tracy's website, which loads terrible slow and is kind of off-kilter I don't think this site generates many new contacts - Quirk SearchStatus only shows back links from her own domain and a single one from 123people, Google doesn't list a single link coming in. Her Facebook page has 2 posts and 30 members and I guess she just started on Twitter, first tweet of the 26 in total was 16.03.11, so hardly any Social Media presence at the moment).

Quantity in products or quality in profit?

So even without a decent web presence her natural products have created such a buzz among her clients, she's managed to sell 70.000+ single items.
Of course, this on its own does not make a new product Britain's' Next Big Thing - having 100 units of your product in every Boots shop would mean you have to at least produce 200.000 units. And of course there's economics in producing big quantities but how about the quality in profit on those same 200.000 units? My - and I think anyone's - guess is that Boots would take the biggest profit from it.

Tracy is only one of the many persons working from a small unit - kitchen, workshop, bedroom - nowadays. And not many will make it "on to the shelves" of Britain's biggest retailers. But in these days of the long tail, easy internet access and free software programs to help you market and sell your products online I'm wondering why many would still opt for increased quantities versus reduced profits in absurd large numbers of units?

Last night's broadcast gave me an extra incentive to create this new guide I have had in mind for the last few weeks "Selling Online Basics" with a bit more haste ;-)
There's a lot of people out there with great products that could do with a simple but effective step by step guide showing them how to keep the full profit in their own pocket.


API - connecting the dots (com)

Was email The electronic innovation of the late 80's, the wibbly.wobbly.web of the late 90's and Cloud computing of the late 00's, Application Program Interface must be The innovations now - do we actually have a name for this decennia yet, do we call this the 10's, tens or teenies?

Connecting dots

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Image taken from Narrow Boat Albert (book-reviews)

In the olden days sending products (read data) needed a lot of manual handling when transported from one area to another. Take for instance transport of goods over water.
Loaded into one boat, "sailed" as for as the water way would carry that particular boat, unloaded again to be loaded into another boat taking it over another water way as far as possible, unloaded/loaded again into another until it finally reached it ultimate destination. Cumbersome and taking a long time. Until larger water ways were connected by canals, reducing the amount of handling tremendously. (I'm rather a fan of the old travel ways using narrow boats, call me a romantic, but have you ever seen the breathtaking aqueducts built especially for this?)

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(Image again from Narrow Boat Albert blog)

Bringing the idea of connecting canals into the 21st century, API connects especially various Cloud computing programs with each other, reducing the number of times data has to be manually handled. Other - desktop - software programs use API also to extend their usefulness.

I regard Cloud Computing programs those software programs you can access anywhere where you have an internet connection, from blogs, email marketing, CRM to ecommerce sites and even online banking (Software as a Service). Accessible everywhere is great, but none or very few programs take care of all the essentials. Email marketing does not include your bookkeeping, blogs don't process your payments from clients and CRM's don't sell your products online.

Meaning, without the means of a API connection, the details of your contact/clients need to be handled many times over. Connecting programs - letting them talk to each other in bits and bytes - overcomes this cumbersome problem.

Take for instance our own secure webshop. Since mid last year we use Ecwid for this, the widget embedded in our blog (and main website also). Client decides to pay using Paypal.
With one click - place order - details of my client are captured in Ecwid, in Paypal and in Kashflow (our bookkeeping program we also started using mid last year).

If I want I can even transfer (one click again) details of this client from Kashflow into MailChimp and email further marketing messages to them. We don't use MailChimp for our email marketing at the moment, Octane HQ takes care of this (including none email marketing), but on the other hand I do have a MailChimp account and use this for a village project.

So, no more manually entering details in various (online) software programs, all done (almost) automagically through API.

Other connections

Of course, other online programs use the same principle. Tweet a message and add specific hash-tags and the same message appears in Facebook, LinkedIn etc. Publish a blog-post, and various API's will show an announcement on Twitter, Facebook to name but a few.

Then there are desktop software programs who, by utilising API, can upload data to all kinds of online programs. One I frequently use - this blog-post on Typepad is a fine example of it - is ScreenSteps Desktop. I can even publish the same article in other programs without having to lift a finger (well, I only have to tell ScreenSteps in which programs I want the post to appear).

Bringing it together

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At the moment I'm working on a specific guide to show how using various Cloud computing programs, all using API in one way or the other, can help you create an ecommerce project very quickly and efficient. My target group will be small business testing the waters of ecommerce, those who need to simply test a new product (digital or physic product) without disrupting their normal website or which could interfere (marketing wise) with their existing ecommerce presence.

For some of the programs in this guide I'll use free editions of award wining software, so even start-ups don't have to break the bank getting started with ecommerce. The beauty of using free edition first is that you can always upgrade to a more advanced edition (with more features and benefits) without having to start all over again.

Still looking for a proper name for the guide though, "connecting the dots (com)" might work here too ;-)

Do you have a favourite program that uses API? And how does it benefit the running of your business?


time warp

Finally - after years and years of trial and error, smoking pc's and phone lines - I managed to email back in time!

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Just by a few minutes only this time, but one of these days someone may be able to read my answer before they even asked the question!


The ultimate "your site cannot be found cold call" stopper - StatCounter

For as long as we manage our own website, blogs and most other online presences we are using StatCounter for web traffic analytics.
StatCounter gives you much more indebt insight in various statistics than IMHO Google Analytics, specially the "visitor path".
I can give you plenty of examples, but that's for another post.

Beta (New) has just got better

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Since the launch of the Beta version, with brand new features making navigation between various projects simpler, I've switched from the old to the new StatCounter site.
During this short time, the good people of StatCounter keep improving the features, giving you more instant extra data.

The statistics of StatCounter has helped us improve our website, we keep an eye on most frequently used search phrases and implement those in our pages or, as happened a few times, wrote whole new pages/guides based on it. The "7 Easy Steps to Repair/Restore your parquet floor" is one of those examples - and within days this page was (and is) one of the most popular pages on our site (and bringing in new clients frequently).

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We know our website, blog and other presence often score high on many Google searches - and still you get, sometimes on a weekly base, those calls from SEO businesses.

"We couldn't find your website on Google, we can help you getting better found" - The Holy Script of all of them I think. My standard answer is always: well, fortunately for us, our clients and prospects can and do find us.

And now this new feature in the New StatCounter will stop them right in their track:

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Just a few examples (at the moment the ranking icon shows only when the searcher used the redirect - cached page).

So, SEO cold callers, be warned. We've now got even more proof you are telling porkies!


Intuit, very relevant? For whom?

Running a small business means, among other things, having to keep the books. Having a "business pondering" blog means writing about relevant programs which, often, make live for small business owners easier/simpler, especially bookkeeping/accounting software.
Writing about software means attracting request from various software programs.

A simple suggestion? Analysed? Relevant?

This morning I received the following email:

Hello,
I am contacting you from Intuit UK regarding a link suggestion for your website.

Intuit UK is a leading provider of business and financial management solutions for small organisations and their advisors including accountants and bookkeepers. The flagship product is QuickBooks, the accounting software designed to help small businesses succeed through taking the worry out of managing business finances. Having analysed your website’s content, we think that a link to QuickBooks would be very relevant and useful to your visitors.

Therefore we would greatly appreciate you placing a link to us from your http://www.thekissbusiness.co.uk page. Should you choose to link to us, our homepage URL is: (*)

Please let me know if you would like some further information regarding linking to QuickBooks and for more information about Intuit UK, please visit (*)

Look forward to hearing from you soon,
Thanks and best regards,
(name removed by me)

My reply:
Sorry, not a fan of Quickbooks and therefore it would not be fare to my readers.
(Plus most often if others ask for links from my site to a program/company they offer a "reward" or link love. Can't see anything you're offering - and that for a large business)

Karin H

Facts:

  • If you suggest something to someone, it normally means it is a benefit for that someone.
  • Anyone analysing my website's content knows - should know - it only links to software programs I use myself (or if I have no need for such a program myself but comes with the high recommendations of someone I trust and who uses the program his/her self).
  • Very relevant and useful to my visitors? Says who?
  • I'm sure you would be greatly appreciate if I hand out link-love, but why should I?
  • You heard from me pretty soon, but where's your answer?

More trouble with "big" software companies

Intuit is "rolling" out a SaaS version of Quickbooks - a beta version you have to pay for for the pleasure of helping them out finding the bugs (Duane Jackson of Kashflow had a field day with this and so did Dennis Howlet)
Next up is Sage, banning Duane from the GEW party - read all about it on Duane's and Dennis' blogs)

Imagine my chuckle when my comment on Duane' post about the ban turned into this tweeter question by him:

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How's that for proper analysing someones website - asking the competition to give out links?

Are the "big" software companies feeling the pressure of being overtaken by other - better, simper, cheaper, better value for money - software companies that they resort to shooting themselves in the foot? Not once, but continuously this week (which is Global Entrepreneurship Week for that matter ;-))

(* = links to the software and business home page removed - of course!)


Using ScreenSteps.Me for Octane HQ

ScreenSteps.Me is the latest addition to the multitude of ways ScreenSteps Desktop gives you to publish your articles/lessons.

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This "lesson" - made in ScreenSteps of course - will show you how you can use it when you have an Octane HQ account to add a new step in a follow up series (email) or a new email campaign broadcast.

Write the article/lesson in ScreenSteps

Utilise all the features SSD gives you, from image capturing (great tool!) to formatting, to write your message. In this particular example I'd already written a blogpost for our FAQ & News site, announcing drastic discounts on our two most popular floors which I wanted to turn into an extra newsletter for all our newsletter subscribers.

when you're article is finished, click the Share Button and select ScreenSteps.Me. After it has uploaded your article/lesson to your ScreenSteps.Me account (free) select Visit.

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Open the document you want to (re)use in Octane HQ and check if everything looks and feels ok.

Create new email campaign in Octane HQ

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Name your new campaign and go the "write your email" step

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In notepad I have my standard email template I use for these type of (short) messages and this template is copied in Source

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Copy HTML or Styled HTML from ScreenSteps.Me

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Add to existing source

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I then have to reshuffle the article title to where I always place the headline of the message

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But that's really all I have to edit, the rest is copied and pasted, including the images used, into the email marketing message.

Send yourself a test message

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Select your contact group you want to email it to, set the time to broadcast it and job done!

Simple - and effective.

ScreenSteps Desktop keeps getting better and better!

 

ScreenSteps - Documentation Done Right


When your accounting program starts emailing you, you pay attention!

Since we switched from Aweber and Mamut CRM to Octane - which does our both email and follow-up marketing - I receive an email every morning telling me which follow-up letters to print, which prospects to custom email or to call in regards of an outstanding quotation. An online program as "task-master" where ever you are (and have internet/email access of course).

I'm also used to receiving emails from my accountant on what to do next on the business, I hope your's does this too. But now even my accounting program is emailing me!

Further switching to on-line programs

In an earlier post I explained why our existing accounting and -ecommerce desktop software needed replacement. The new Ecwid e-commerce widget was quickly found and doing what it is supposed to be doing: easy navigation for our online shoppers with a simple and straight forward check-out process (offering various payment options too).

Next up was the accounting part. The search concentrated on UK based SaaS (Software as a Service) software, eliminating waiting time on support tickets if and when needed (5 - 8 hours time difference between UK and USA is half a days work missed - been there, waited that long). Having some experience with Liberty accounting I discarded that program - not flexible enough for my standard/methods of bookkeeping, project management and financial reporting (yes, we are a small company but facts and figures does help you to know where you stand and where you want to go, so rather important).

Kashflow, online accounting softwareHad a look at Clearbooks but like Liberty it has a fixed fee for limit on transactions then additional costs when you go over your "llimit", which IMHO restricts effective bookkeeping in service of financial management. So I in the end I selected Kashflow (found this program through a tweet from Duane Jackson, Kashflow's founder, when I tweeted about Clearbooks - now that's a clever and effective use of twitter).

Liked what I saw and read, specially the API link between Paypal and the online software, plus one fixed fee per month for everyone with no nonsense about limiting the number of transactions. Free trial available for 2 months - which I took. After only 1 week I decided to open an account - free trial continues, I won't be billed until this period has finished.

When features are benefits

Kashflow comes with many (simple) features which in many cases are real benefits for those, like me, who consider bookkeeping an essential and important part of running your business in such a way that working in the business becomes working on the business.

Customer details included the source this contact came from (with the additional "feature" of setting a cost per source - enabling you to finally discover which 50% of marketing expenditure works (sure you all know the famous quote about knowing 50% or your marketing budget works, but you don't know which 50%), reports of income per month or any period you want to see, per source, drilling down to client level.
(Side-note: I have one little problem with these on screen pie-chart reports: selecting invoice issued or invoices paid gives a rather different result, one reports ex VAT, the other including VAT; just a matter of adjusting the way you "think" about "income" I guess.)

Like the first ever bookkeeping program I selected when we first arrived in the UK (there is a slight difference in Dutch or English bookkeeping methods, won't go into that here) MYOB, Kashflow trusts its users to know what they are doing and allows editing of bookings unlike other - big name - software programs. When MYOB was taken over by Mamut we added the accounting package to the Mamut CRM - only to discover that now some beneficial items of the CRM program no longer worked. The only solutions was to upgrade again to an even higher package (Enterprice 3) to resolve this problem. Strange but true.

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Mamut accounting did not have the option of editing any of the bookings which meant credit notes, correction journals etc. Finally with the last upgrade this was sorted: only it seemed Mamut is so afraid business owners do not know what they are doing that every time you want to correct/edit a booking (only very limited corrections also) you had to enter your user name and password again, even when you - like me - are the only administrator in the program. For every single correction!
Come on Mamut - we're no naughty kids, we are business owners!

Anyway, those days are now gone and I'm quite happy with the Kashflow online software. When the trial period is over we'll be paying £ 14.99 ex VAT per month, plus £8.45 per month for the Paypal imports. There is a second option for Papal, importing income and outcome once a week for £2.99 a month but I decided to compare "costs" versus time to be spent on adding known data - already online - to another program manually.

Since the switch from Mamut ecommerce to Ecwid ecommerce there has been a significant increase in online orders being paid through Paypal express or normal Paypal checkout. More orders also mean more often booking the courier (also online, great company) which we pay by Paypal. All sales, purchase and transfer details are collected by Kashflow once every hour through the Paypal API, creating new customers or suppliers where needed and adding the invoice, purchase order to the contacts. IMHO this saves me more in time than the £ 8.45 represents.

Minor issues

Of course, there are - as with every program - minor issues. Already some of my questions/querries, suggestions submitted through the excellent and quick to respond support desk (who seem to work during the evenings and weekends!) have been added to the to-do-list of the development team. Could be that I have a different way of looking at bookkeeping than others, but nice to know Kashflow appreciates involvement of their clients.

One of the issues I have are the product codes: at the moment I have to create a product code in both the "Sales-Type (as Kashflow renamed the nominal accounts group for turnover) as well as to the "Outgoing Types" (as Kashflow renamed the nominal code groups for costs of sales and expenditures).

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Why not one product code tab which has a sales type and an outgoing type as default value? I'm adding the code products now as and when needed.

Repeat purchases are easily created, which is a great time saver, only not for those suppliers who bill you in different currency than GBP

Repeat invoices and bank transactions can also be created, only not repeat journals. You can create journal templates though, so perhaps turning the templates into repeat journals once o month, quarter etc will be possible in the near future too. I hope so.

The software works so effective the "books" are now up to date every day, more and more purchases are added to the automated repeat purchase list, so next month I'll have even fewer items to book. And the normal financial management reports I create every 3 months for myself and my team, including our accountant, are already "in there" with one click of a button.

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So top marks and the Kiss Award for Kashflow, makes running your business easier with in-depth instant details on how you're doing. And of course sending me early morning emails telling me which suppliers need paying and which clients should pay us today.

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(Side-note on Mamut: I've now been told that because we're not renewing the annual service agreement fee I will loose access to the desktop software program the minute the existing agreement ends. A desktop program - not online "hire" of server space. When I argued I'd paid for the actual program itself and the service agreement is for updates and support all I hear is: it is mentioned in the licence agreement. Well, the person who sold me the first ever Mamut product (CRM & Sales) never told me that.
So, be warned if your business needs a more complex Enterprise Solution - check you don't end up with only the exported bits and bytes of all your historical data when you cancel the service agreement of a desktop program!)